Florence

Florence

Seven years ago, fresh off surgeries, ambulance rides, ICU treatments, and a year that would not give an inch, my husband and I took a pause to travel through Italy with his family – a trip that we are still talking about with awe and wonder. The central element of that trip – three days in Florence.  So, naturally, my Brunelleschi-loving husband, and his Botticelli-adoring wife could think of only one city that they couldn’t wait to visit again with our two sons in tow — Florence!

The itinerary: one afternoon, a full day, and one long morning. But, first, we have to get there from Cinque Terre.

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Trains & Public Transit Options: 2017

 

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Taking the train through Cinque Terre, October 2010

As a family of four we will be “backpacking” through France, Italy, and the Netherlands through a series of planes, trains, and automobiles.  Because I know that wireless access can be limited when travelling, I am saving all of the relevant train schedules for June 2017 here so I have an easy one-stop solution for calling an audible on train travel during the trip.

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Roman Forums, Palatine Hill, July 2015

Rome: Three Day Itinerary

With two teenage boys in tow, one European city is a guaranteed winner – Rome. Although, I will admit, it has taken four trips to Rome for me to learn to love the Eternal City, so positioning this trip at the end of our journey goes against my basic advice: hit Rome first, while you still have enough energy for this buzzing, complicated, frenetic, city. But, logistics of our trip being what they are, we’ll be hitting Rome as our penultimate stop. That in mind, I booked a relaxing hotel with a gorgeous pool outside the city center to ensure we could escape from Rome if we start feeling overwhelmed by the crowds or the heat.

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Dining in Venice: Bacari


Ca’ d’Oro/Alla Vedova. Calle del Pistor, Cannaregio 3912. One of the most famous bàcari in Venice, this one’s both away from the city’s crowds and on the cheap (€1) end of things, ideal if you’re on a budget. Don’t miss the polpette,meatballs made of pork.

La Cantina. Calle San Felice, 3689. A stone’s throw from Alla Vedova, La Cantina features inventive dishes, using fresh ingredients like beef tongue or fresh ricotta. A local favorite.

This isn’t just a popular area for tourists… it has some othe best bàcari in town!

All’Arco. Calle Arco, San Polo 436. Another one of Venice’s most-loved spots, All’Arco, near the Ponte Rialto, is packed at lunchtime with shoppers from the local fish market. Everything from calamari to liver to shrimp is on offer, and if it’s available, don’t miss the hot sandwich of boiled beef sausage and mustard.

Do Mori. Sestiere San Polo 429, Calle dei Do Mori. Myth has it that Casanova frequented this bàcaro, also near the Rialto Bridge. Even if he didn’t, it’s still thought to be the oldest in Venice, dating back to 1462. Ask for the “francobollo”(postage stamp)—a tiny sandwich with various fillings, it’s the house specialty.

Cicchetti at one of the bacari in Venice

Do Spad

Do Spade. Calle delle Do Spade, 19 S. Polo 860. Another bàcaro dating back to the 15th century, Do Spade has lots of seafood on offer, as well as a variety of vegetable and cheese Cantinone–già Schiavi. Ponte San Trovaso, Dorsoduro 992. This family-runbàcaro, located across from a gondola workshop,oasts raw fismeats, more than 30 wines available by the glass, and much more. Crowded with Venetians in the evening!


Do Spade. Calle delle Do Spade, 19 S. Polo 860. Another bàcaro dating back to the 15th century, Do Spade has lots of seafood on offer, as well as a variety of vegetable and cheese spreads.

Cantinone–già Schiavi. Ponte San Trovaso, Dorsoduro 992. This family-runbàcaro, located across from a gondola workshop, boasts raw fish, meats, more than 30 wines available by the glass, and much more. Crowded with Venetians in the evening!

Al Ponte. Calle Larga Giacinto Gallina. One of the cheapest bàcari—and, therefore, places to eat—in all of Venice, Al Ponte has pasta and fish plates and a welcoming atmosphere.

Banco Giro. Campo San Giacometto, San Polo 122. A Grand Canal view, a variety of cheeses, fish, and wine, and a lively atmosphere. What’s not to like?


— Courtesy, Walks of Italy